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Though Straton himself never used the term, his remark about the inescapable materiality of life - that like the bronze giant Talos, "even the most faithful philosopher cannot live without his blood" - ultimately became known as the Talos Principle. What seemingly enraged many of his contemporaries and a significant number of later thinkers is the principle's simplicity and unassailability, which (according to a fragment found in Miletus) "cut through their rhetorical webs, which sought to tangle the listener with fanciful words and thoughts of the heavens, like Alexander's sword through the Gordian Knot."

Diogenes Laertius makes mention of a dialogue by Anaximander of Chalcedon that expanded greatly on the Talos Principle, but that work remains lost.

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Though Straton himself never used the term, his remark about the inescapable materiality of life - that like the bronze giant Talos, "even the most faithful philosopher cannot live without his blood" - ultimately became known as the Talos Principle. What seemingly enraged many of his contemporaries and a significant number of later thinkers is the principle's simplicity and unassailability, which (according to a fragment found in Miletus) "cut through their rhetorical webs, which sought to tangle the listener with fanciful words and thoughts of the heavens, like Alexander's sword through the Gordian Knot." 

Diogenes Laertius makes mention of a dialogue by Anaximander of Chalcedon that expanded greatly on the Talos Principle, but that work remains lost.

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